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Security Forces trains to take on active shooter threat

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NEW CASTLE AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Del. - 166th Security Forces Squadron team members sweep through a room while performing room clearing procedures during a training event held Nov. 4. 166th SFS Airmen were training to successfully counter an active shooter threat. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Gwendolyn Blakley/Released).

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NEW CASTLE AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Del. – Members of the 166th Security Forces Squadron take a photo following a training event Nov. 4. Training was held at the Boeing Hangar, which is maintained by the Delaware River and Bay Authority- Delaware State Police. Members practiced readiness response to active shooter threats. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Gwendolyn Blakley/Released).

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NEW CASTLE AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, Del. - Members of the 166th Security Forces Squadron gathered to receive an exercise briefing, as well as simulated ammunition and supplies to be utilized during a training event held Nov. 4. 166th SFS Airmen practiced response to active shooter threats using weapons that are outfitted to use simulated ammunition. Training was held at the Boeing Hangar, which is maintained by the Delaware River and Bay Authority- Delaware State Police. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Gwendolyn Blakley/Released).

New Castle, Del. --

The 166th Security Forces Squadron held a simulation training session Nov. 4, 2017, at the Boeing Hangar in New Castle, Delaware, testing the members’ response to active shooter incidents in hostile fire situations.

Security Forces personnel view training opportunities as a crucial part of readiness and mission success. 

 “We are training to be more proficient against the insider threat,” said Master Sgt. Timothy Luko, 166th Security Forces Squadron chief of information protection. “The harder we train the more prepared we will be if the real thing happens.”

The three phases of the training included a building walk through, review of room clearing procedures with no aggressor, and concluded with the progression of events culminating with returning adversary fire.

Teams carried “simunitions” as part of the training. The standard issue M9 sidearm had its bolt removed and replaced with a blue simulation bolt, which only permits the simulated ammunition to fire in the weapon.

Simulated rounds are very similar to paintballs, and leave a visible marker that an exercise participant has been hit.

Tech. Sgt. Richard Bergante, combat arms instructor, 166th Security Forces Squadron, said, “Training is imperative. As security forces, we are the first line of defense at any base across the globe, and we need to be trained in those situations.”

Tech. Sgt. Nephtali Ortiz agreed.

“We conduct this form of training annually; it is necessary for us to be proficient to deter the possible threat of an active shooter. With the recent active shooter incidents that have taken place we must be prepared,” said Tech. Sgt. Nephtali Ortiz.                                                                      

Security Forces mentioned that practicing simulated events at offsite locations provides the opportunity for members train at unfamiliar terrain. The Boeing Hangar is maintained by the Delaware River and Bay Authority/Delaware State Police.